Graduate and Undergraduate Fellowships

The HDW provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in research projects led by Washington University faculty. For information, please email Douglas Knox with a short description of your interest in the program.

Past participants have found it a valuable professional development opportunity. Recent projects have included:

  • Violence Against Women Database (Jami Ake, IPH)
  • Material Culture and the 19th-Century German Novel (Matt Erlin, German)
  • Creating a Federal Government (Peter Kastor, History & AMCS)
  • The Spenser Project (Joseph Loewenstein, English)
  • The Bizet Catalogue (Hugh Macdonald, Music)
  • US Publication of 19th Century German Novels (Lynne Tatlock, German)

The ideal fellow has an interest in the application of technology to the humanities. While the needs of each project are different, typical activities include research and the preparation and preliminary analysis of textual and visual materials. Specialized technical skills are not required, though students with some familiarity with or interest in XSLT, CSS, or web programming may find ways to make use of that knowledge.

Summer Fellowships

Summer Student Fellowships

The Humanities Digital Workshop invites applications from undergraduate and graduate students at Washington University in St. Louis for its summer fellowships. The fellowships pair students with humanities faculty engaged in digital humanities projects for 8 weeks, during which time students gain exposure to digital humanities work on campus and at large, work closely with faculty members and other students on an active project, and learn relevant digital humanities tools and standards. Past participants have found it a valuable professional development opportunity. The ideal fellow has an interest in the application of technology to the humanities. While the needs of each project are different, typical activities include research and the preparation and preliminary analysis of textual and visual materials. Specialized technical skills are not required, though students with computational skills may find ways to make use of that knowledge.

The fellowships run from May 26 to July 17, 2020 and involve 30 hours of work per week for undergraduates, and a commitment of 20 hours per week for graduate students.

To apply, send your CV or résumé and a paragraph-long description of your interest in the digital humanities and in the HDW to Douglas Knox.

Applications are due by March 2, 2020.

Summer 2020 Library Staff Fellowships

Library staff fellows join project teams during the HDW summer workshop for approximately 20 hours per week. No particular technical or field expertise is required, although we are always happy to make use of the skills and professional expertise that people bring to projects. Libraries staff should request participation from supervisor and AUL for the required time to devote to the Summer Workshop, and consult with their supervisors to ensure that participation in the program will not adversely affect normal work day activities.

To apply, send your CV or résumé and a paragraph-long description of your interest in the digital humanities and in the HDW. Applications or questions can be directed to Doug Knox.

Library fellow applications are due by April 3, 2020.

Our Past Summer Fellows

Undergraduate Semester Fellowships

The Humanities Digital Workshop announces openings for undergraduate students in its Fall 2020 Fellowships. The fellowships pair students with humanities faculty engaged in digital humanities projects for the academic semester, during which time students:

  • gain exposure to digital humanities work on campus and at large
  • work closely with faculty members and other students on an active project, and
  • learn relevant digital humanities tools and standards

Past participants have found it a valuable professional development opportunity.

The ideal fellow has an interest in the humanities and a capacity for interest in the application of technology to them, but is not necessarily a humanities student, nor must he or she be highly technically experienced. Typical activities include markup of textual and visual material in XML or designing the display of same for the web, as well as tasks such as library and bibliographical research, and annotation and organization of secondary source material.

Details

The fellowship will involve 5 hours of work per week. Apart from a one-hour weekly meeting, most work will be flexible according to student schedules. Students will have an opportunity to renew the fellowship for the summer and the following year. Compensation is $10.50 an hour.

For more info, or to apply

To apply, send your CV or résumé and a paragraph-long description of your interest in the digital humanities and in the HDW. Applications or questions can be directed to Doug Knox.

Applications received by Monday, September 7, 2020 will be considered first, with the possibility of rolling acceptances after that if space is available.

The Spenser Project has taught me the importance of organization, communication, and project sustainability, especially for a group project of the Spenser Project’s scale. I’ve learned so much from working in a communal space, not just about other digital humanities projects and different disciplines, but I’ve also met a lot of people who all think in different, valuable ways.

―Elizabeth SchwartzAB '21

Contact

If you have questions or wish to apply for one of our fellowship programs, please contact Douglas Knox.

Contact Douglas Knox